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Mountain Lion Visited a La Crescenta Neighborhood Sunday

Neighbors reported a mountain lion sighting in the 5400 block of Pineridge Drive, between La Crescenta and Rosemont avenues.

Last week a . This week, a mountain lion made its debut. 

A resident reported seeing a mountain lion Sunday in the 5400 block of Pineridge Drive about 8 p.m. Sunday, Sheriff's Sgt. Brett Hanson of the Crescenta Valley Station told Patch. 

Deputies went out and checked the entire area, but were unable to locate the mountain lion, Hanson said. 

Mountain lions are solitary animals found where deer ususually graze, according to the California Department of Fish & Game. These animals can also eat small pets, too. 

Here are tips for living in mountain lion country and preventing mountain lion visits

  • Don’t feed deer; it is illegal in California and it will attract mountain lions.
  • Deer-proof your landscaping by avoiding plants that deer like to eat. For tips, request A Gardener’s Guide to Preventing Deer Damage from DFG offices.
  • Trim brush to reduce hiding places for mountain lions.
  • Don’t leave small children or pets outside unattended.
  • Install motion-sensitive lighting around the house.
  • Provide sturdy, covered shelters for sheep, goats, and other vulnerable animals.
  • Don’t allow pets outside when mountain lions are most active—dawn, dusk, and at night.
  • Bring pet food inside to avoid attracting raccoons, opossums and other potential mountain lion prey.

Authorities urge anyone who faces a mountain lion to call 911 immediately.

Here are tips to keep you safe if you encounter a mountain lion along a trail from the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA

  • Never hike alone and always stay on trails 
  • Keep children close to you  
  • Do not approach the animal 
  • Do not run from the animal 
  • Always stand tall, make eye contact and pick up children without turning your back to the animal 
  • Do all you can to make yourself bigger. Raise your arms, throw stones, branches, make noise, wave your arms slowly and speak loud 
  • If coyotes are in your yard bang pots and pans together or make other loud noises to scare them away 
  • Carry an umbrella with you on walks. If encountered by coyotes open umbrella to scare them away
  • Report sightings to authorities immediately 

Mountain lions tend to stay away from people, but there are rare cases of fatal attacks, according to fish and game officials. 

The only reported mountain lion attack in Los Angeles County happened in 1995 to a 27-year-old man at Mt. Lowe in Altadena, the agency reported. The man survived the incident. 

Krae911 April 18, 2012 at 07:06 AM
I feel so badly for all of the wild animals that have to venture down "our" way for food and water. That darn Station Fire really did a number on us ALL ! Living within walking distance to Deukmejian, I have hiked up there with my dog and 2 kids....Now, the Spring weather is great and I really would love to take a stroll, but these sightings have me unnerved. I've been raised in the Crescenta Valley and I love the proximity to wildlife ---- I also RESPECT it. Until the vegetation grows back and these sightings are MUCH less, I will opt for walks around the Rose Bowl and outings to the soon-to-be-opened Dog Park.
Nicole Charky (Editor) April 18, 2012 at 01:59 PM
Hey Krae, thank you for your insight. I wonder if other people are feeling the same way.
KK April 18, 2012 at 09:08 PM
Yes, yes they are...and, what dog park??!!
Nicole Charky (Editor) April 19, 2012 at 06:26 PM
Oh man, check out the dog park: http://patch.com/A-qWDx
Bob McCoy April 25, 2012 at 08:10 PM
President Theodore Roosevelt, no stranger to wildlife, wrote: “It is true, as I have said, that a cougar will follow a man; but then a weasel will sometimes do the same thing. Whatever the cougar's motive, it is certain that in the immense majority of cases there is not the slightest danger of his attacking the man he follows.” (BiblioBazaar (2009) The Roosevelt Book: Selections from the Writings of Theodore Roosevelt, p 183) A more scientific view states: “Low levels of confirmed interactions coupled with exceedingly low interaction rates calls into question the validity of management decisions based on interaction reports while suggesting the perceived level of risk from cougars in residential areas disproportionally exceeds actual risk.” (University of Washington (2010) Cougar Ecology, Behavior, and Interactions with People in a Wildland-Urban Environment in Western Washington, Brian N. Kertson, Abstract) Rather than curtail walks in your favorite places, why not buy a canister of EPA-registered Bear Spray? Bear spray stops most wildlife, domesticated animals, and humans. It does not replace common-sense or vigilance, but can reduce your anxiety about a chance encounter. Also, an air-horn can make a loud continuous noise to scare away a lion.
Krae911 April 26, 2012 at 04:16 AM
Mr. Mccoy ~ I can't believe I didn't think of the airhorn idea, as I am an avid mountain camper & ALWAYS keep one at my campsite - duh! Thank you so much for shaking me out of my trepidation. Airhorn it is! Duke Park, here I come :-)

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